Quantifying the Social in ESG Accountability

During a recent Bloomberg-sponsored conversation, titled “Quantifying the S in ESG,” Regina Curry, Chief Diversity Officer at Franklin Templeton, and Germaine Hunter, Vice President for Global Inclusion & Diversity at the Clorox Company, discussed this rise in demand for social data, what that means for corporations, and the overall business case for equality, moderated by Sabina Mehmood, Product Manager of the Bloomberg Gender-Equality Index (GEI).

As with overall investment interest, disclosure of social data is on the rise. “Companies are increasing their transparency, with respect to key social metrics,” Kane said. “As transparency is increasing, we’re also seeing an increase in ESG-themed ETFs, specifically the development of social-specific ETFs.” These include gender- and diversity and inclusion-related data. The amount of interest and investment in these vehicles, according to Bloomberg data, has been consistently increasing over the past five years.

In 2021, more investors are pressuring the corporate world on D&I, pushing to ensure their workforces — particularly in senior management — reflect the overall diversity of the U.S. population. Social issues generally, which include topics such as pharmaceutical prices, worker pay and scrutiny of supply chains, have garnered a total of 92 resolutions for this year’s proxy-voting season, according to the Bloomberg Intelligence. When considering other ESG factors, that compares with 43 for governance proposals and 30 for the environment as of April 15.

As with overall investment interest, disclosure of social data is on the rise. “Companies are increasing their transparency, with respect to key social metrics,” Kane said. “As transparency is increasing, we’re also seeing an increase in ESG-themed ETFs, specifically the development of social-specific ETFs.” These include gender- and diversity and inclusion-related data. The amount of interest and investment in these vehicles, according to Bloomberg data, has been consistently increasing over the past five years.

What was moving slowly before 2020, with the advent of some of the worst leadership in recorded history. Then add to that a planet wide pandemic which exacerbated the inequalities amongst us, was the perfect storm to catapult ESG to the top of the list. Today, we understand that climate change and environmental factors are our responsibilities as a species on this green and blue marble. But we are a bit late to the party, and need to catch up before it is too late, altogether. This change will be driven from the leadership of investors, boards and management who will be tasked with making corporate socially responsible decisions which will lead us all forward into an equitable future. This is a good example of real conversations which need to take place. How to start them, and how to have them.

Click here to view original web page at www.bloomberg.com

What is ESG for Companies in Vancouver,BC?

ESG has been around for decades. Recent events have accelerated the need for businesses to make changes.  Environment, Social and Governance may well determine your future success, or failure. Whether you have business in Vancouver or anywhere else.

The term ESG investing was first coined in 2004. It was a part of a study by the UN Global Compact. ESG stands for environmental, social and governance, the 3 cornerstone indicators for investors. The report proposed that “Who Cares Wins.” In 2005, the UN Principles for Responsible Investment, or (UN PRI). The report detailed a plan for investment designed to make life fairer for all and save the planet.

Do ESG Investment Principles Matter in Vancouver?

E, S & G are 3 pillars of ethics measurement for a business or enterprise. They are factors which are driving investor decisions around the world. ESG criteria measure non-financial features which determine how attractive you are for investment. A low ESG score may prevent a company from getting a sustainability score. A low sustainability score will most likely prevent any relevant confidence by investors.

If you have a business in Vancouver, then you will want to read further. If you are looking for investment or want to list on an Exchange, then you will want to examine your portfolio. You will need to establish a Score for potential ESG compliance issues.

What is CSR for Companies in Vancouver?

CSR stands for Corporate Social Responsibility. It is a measurement of a company’s ethical impact on the society it serves. This can include positive impacts like philanthropic endeavours or negative impacts like pollution. It is a report which shows a company’s contributions to the greater community of Vancouver.

The CSR Policy should cover many core elements with regular reporting. These include care for all stakeholders and ethical functioning. There should be a section on respect for Workers’ Rights and Welfare and Human Rights. It should detail all aspects which show respect for Environment.  Finally, the report should include activities for Social and Inclusive Development.

What is DEI for Business in British Columbia

The world has changed and smart companies are changing within it. Diversity, equity and inclusion are terms which are a part of your ESG. Many companies implement these strategies through governance. With the direct effects will be seen in social and environmental actions. They are programs which encourage the participation of diverse groups of people.

Workplace diversity includes people of different genders, races and ethnicities. It also includes abilities and disabilities, religion, culture, age and sexual orientations. socioeconomic status, language or political perspective. The goal is to create more inclusive working environments for everyone.

A good outline for a Diversity, Equity and Inclusion plan will include a DEI Strategic Plan. It will also include a leadership commitment to the plan. It will address the recruitment and hiring of diverse talent. This could include neurodiverse candidates. It will require reporting on inclusive performance management. It will detail equitable and inclusive culture. The report will conclude with highlights listing the effects on the marketplace. It will also outline community impact. There is an increasing demand for reporting for companies in Vancouver, the Island and around the world